--[ x14km2d

| Texture Bases

--[ 0 - Intro --[ 1 - Coffee Leftovers --[ A - Comment --[ B - Changelog

24/10/2021

--[ 0 - Intro

When you start with wargaming tabletop, you first do everything that is given in the manufacturer tutorials. Then, when you are a little more confident, you make your first attempts or start experimenting yourself. This is quite normal in modeling and most ideas from forums, blogs or videos come from people who have tried an idea. Many of these ideas fail and that is also quite normal[1]. Not everything works the first time and sometimes you need two, three or even many attempts until an idea works. In this article I will try out ideas from other people or even develop some myself. It will be mainly about textures for your bases. Maybe I'll also try and compare textures pastes from manufacturers at some point, but that will come later.

--[ 1 - Coffee Leftovers

Above you can see two bases with a texture I created myself. The concept is based on a video from Midwinter Minis in which a texture was built with coffee powder remnants. I found the idea so exciting that I wanted to try it out. So I took my roommates coffee leftovers and mixed that, unlike Midwinter Minis, with Mod Podge. Since I had already mixed my Mod Podge with black acrylic paint, it matched quite well in terms of color. Also, Mod Podge better seals the coffee leftovers from the air so they don't get moldy. I used brown Dollar Store acrylic paint as a base. I then dry brushed this with Averland Sunset and Longbeard Grey. Lastly, I used an Army Painter Soft Tone wash to add more depth to the base. I was surprised how good the result looks and if I ever need to do a quick texture base, I will come back to the coffee method. Something that was also mentioned in the video and I can also confirm here. It is so often natural products used in modeling, props or even in theater props. For example, I have a series of canvases that were made of texture paste. These I had created from garlic powder, cilli pods, oregano and oil paints. no idea why. I was young and convinced myself I was a great artist who needed to try extreme ideas to become a better artist. Anyway, none of the canvases have gone moldy yet and won't in my lifetime. So you will not notice, if you have worked cleanly, that your bases will get moldy.

--[ A - Comment

[1] Sometimes I have the feeling that our societies unfortunately teach young people and children the wrong values in some places. For example, in relation to failure. Young people are taught that failure is something bad. This is not true. You don't 'have to be great at sports, have the best grades in math, and if you paint a picture, it has to be better than everyone else's. That's only partly true. Of course, it's good if you push yourself to great achievements, but very few bring that to a mastery. They then take their cue from the best artists, the best singers, designers or musicians and then fail because of their own values. Most of them can't cope with that and can't process it psychologically. I would like to say something about that briefly.

It is good to fail and make mistakes, then that means you are in a learning process. Even if you make mistakes, you will have learned something from them later. Of course it is better to look at other people's mistakes and learn from them. But sometimes you have to make mistakes yourself, so that you learn something about yourself. Some mistakes you shouldn't make either, but that's a whole other topic again. Anyway, it's not bad to fail because it grounds you and brings you back down to earth. Sometimes we tell ourselves we can do something very well, but that's not true. Because. Those who can assess themselves very well and also critically question themselves fail less. I know, for example, that I could never be a good musician or singer. I have tried this several times and failed. There are many people on this planet who can do much better. It is ok to fail. Sometimes. Eventually you'll find your niche where you're really good and maybe you'll master it. Oh. And by the way. it's better to start small if you want to fail less.

--[ B - Changelog